Table of Contents

Kausilay (Calophyllum leleanii p.f. stevens) stump, its red interior and yellowish sap evident. Although people can associate the red color with menstrual blood, hence connoting the feminine quality given to the tree, they also say the blood color is like the red color prominent in exposed thigh muscle.

Kausilay (Calophyllum leleanii p.f. stevens) stump, its red interior and yellowish sap evident. Although people can associate the red color with menstrual blood, hence connoting the feminine quality given to the tree, they also say the blood color is like the red color prominent in exposed thigh muscle.

 

PART I AMONG THE SCIENTISTS New Perspectives on the Massim
“Like all savages, the natives are suspicious of strangers”1

Introduction: CHANGES AND LAST CHAPTERS

Chapter 1: RETURN TO THE GARDEN: Gwed, locating intentions and interpretive puzzles

PART II  TOWARDS AN ETHNOGRAPHY OF TREES
“A patch is an ecologically distinct locality in the landscape; it is problem- and organism-defined, relative to the behavior, size, mobility, habits and perceptive capabilities of the population…In general, patches are localized discontinuities in the landscape which affect behavior…”  (Winterhalder 1994: 33).

Chapter 2: THE TREES—Basic Categories and Landscape Beacons

Chapter 3:  THE FORESTS and FIRE: Tasim, Inverted Landscapes, and the Social Use of Trees.

Chapter 4:  A STORY OF CALOPHYLLUM: On the Human-Flora Continuum

PART III  SYNTHESIZING MODELS
“…it is the processes of adjustment that are taken to be fundamental…” (Winterhalder, 1994:33)
“As with any great work of art, one acquires by study a deeper awareness of the work’s inner relationships.”  (Garry Wills 2002: 85)

Chapter 5: VATUL: A Life Form and a Form for Life

Chapter 6: GEOMETRIES OF MOTION: Trees and the Boats of the Eastern Kula Ring

 


1Woodford, C. M. 1890 A Naturalist Among the Headhunters. London: Philip George & Son P. 8  Quoted from Damon (MS) “Fifteen Years Among the Scientists: A Social Anthropologist Reflecting on his Encounter with the Natural Sciences and Mathematics, ” in the Conference ‘Challenges to Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research,’ December 14-16, 2006, Taipei, Taiwan Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica Charles Morris Woodford was a “Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society; Corresponding member of the Zoological Society; Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of Australia; Fellow of the Linnæan Society of New South Wales.” He was in the Solomon Islands three times in 1886, 1887, & 1889.

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