Category Archives: Blue Horses Rush In

Distance: Proximity and Clarity in the Life of Luci Tapahanso, by Will Cadigan

Geography has played an immense role in the shaping of human society. In the American southwest, the prominent mountains and vast deserts helped define the societies that blossomed there, and how they interacted with the cultures that collided with them. … Continue reading

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The Balancing of Two Cultures, by Jetara Johnson

In Blue Horses Rush In, Luci Tapahonso uses cultural references to express challenges that Navajo women encounter. These challenges revolve around Navajo women balancing domestic responsibilities and individual ambitions such as ensuring that their children embrace Navajo culture and advancing … Continue reading

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The History of the Hogan and Tapahonso’s Solidification of Navajo Imagery, by Victoria Maiden

Rich, round, cone-shaped buildings enclosed the lives of the Navajo people, and became the homes to their culture. These homes for Navajo families were known as hogans, or “hooghans”(15).  In Lucy Tapahonso’s poem, “Starlore”, the speaker shares her spiritual experience … Continue reading

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Tenacity of the Navajo, by Deirdre Klima

Growing up on a Reservation in New Mexico, Luci Tapahonso represents the product of a great and proud native people of the U.S. – The Navajo. In her writing, which draws deeply not only from her personal life and beliefs, … Continue reading

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The Geography of Separation in “Tsaile April Nights” by Luci Tapahonso, by Kristina Wiles

On first read, “Tsaile April Nights” by Luci Tapahonso does not seem like a poem with much of a story, but on second read a sad struggle appears. The poem roots itself in the landscape and geography of the Southwest … Continue reading

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