Month: November 2011

A Final Wrap Up!

  Cosmopolitanism, Metropole, Periphery, Orientalism, Globalization, Indigenization, World System, Civilization, Decolonization, Same and Other. These once foreign terms now hold enormous amounts of meaning to me. Though many of my opinions have remained the same about the importance of non-…

Resistance in Theory and in Reality

In a global context, and the Arab Spring in particular, resistance has often been classified as either violent or non-violent. Resistance and violence, or the lack thereof, have been analyzed and scrutinized by many in the past and while they…

Smarter Farming Practices in Africa

In my last post, I discussed the nutrition gap between the poor and ultra poor. Sub-Saharan malnutrition ultimately stems from economic issues. Many of the ultra poor migrate to cities where they receive slightly better wages, but are only slightly…

Trouble in Paradise

All semester I’ve been blogging about uprisings and social disturbances in Southeast Asia, specifically in India. Today, I am tired of it. This morning I submitted a research paper about the Indian economy, so this afternoon I feel as though…

The ILO and the Roots of Poverty

After stripping down the embedded cultural dimension of discrimination against the Roma people, one if left with the current facts and the effects of governmental policy on the everyday lives of this minority.  One of the most glaring consequences of…

Money Shortage vs. Money Efficiency

Many are under the impression that problems of Sub-Saharan Africa can simply be solved by more donations. But it seems like Sub-Saharan Africa is always lacking money. Yet in an email exchange with Missionary Han, who I mentioned in my…

Before our final post, I wanted to take this week to look at a greater picture of the issues surrounding gender equality in the Arab Spring, the Middle East/North African (MENA) region, and the world as a whole to round…

Children of Migrant Workers

This week I wanted to return to the topic of migrant workers. In my exchange with my pen pal from China, she was kind enough to link me to a website that introduced government initiatives that helps out the children…

An Arab Spring in North Korea?

Will there be an Arab Spring in North Korea? If life in the DPRK is as horrible as the media makes it out to be, then it seems reasonable that a civilian insurrection could follow. We do know that China…

AIDS in India

For my final “regular” blog post, I’ve decided to write about the issue of AIDS in India, seeing as tomorrow, December 1st, is World AIDS day. According to AVERT, an International HIV/AIDS charity, there are 2.4 million people living with…

Food Crisis in Horn of Africa

I thought I’d pick something really prevalent in the news today for this last blog post. I use twitter specifically to follow development organizations and to see what the latest problems and advancements are in the field. For the past…

Need for Improvement

In my last post, “Demographics of the Sex Buyer,” I discussed how ordinary men were participating in prostitution, strip clubs, and even sex trade because the commercial sex industry normalized this behavior. Now, I want to figure out what is…

Culture Holds the Root of Conflict

Most issues of equality around the world revolve around certain groups of people living with more luxury with more access to necessities and goods than others. In the United States, our culture is constantly reiterating the fact that we should…

Multiculturalism: Britain’s Civic Religion

In recent years, Britain’s unwavering adherence to the doctrine of multiculturalism has increasingly come under attack. In a Vanity Fair article titled “Londonistan Calling”, the author Christopher Hitchens says, “For the British mainstream, multiculturalism has been the official civic religion for…

Ventilation: Reality of Immigration

In reading “The Hispanic Challenge,” it’s clear that Huntington finds his view to be pragmatic and rooted in reality. But I  disagree. Yes, limiting immigration would have economic advantages, and less people would have to learn Spanish. But I think…

Selling Sex in Sub-saharan Africa

Throughout the semester I have narrowed my focus on poverty, inequality and health in Sub-Saharan Africa to the women of this region and how these global issues have affected them. With this, My last three posts have surrounded the topics…

Ventilation: Identity Crisis

Each of the readings this week seem to have a completely different insight and opinion on the topic of Latino immigration. Huntington appears to be highly critical of immigration because of the trend of Latinos migrating to a specific area…

China and Amnesty International

A few weeks ago, I was lucky enough to attend the Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference for Amnesty International in the Washington D.C. area. One of the first speakers was the temporary head of the domestic office speaking to a variety of…

Somalia

This post was submitted a few weeks ago, but when I checked on my blog today I saw it never posted. Sorry for the delay! I initially was going to finish the semester writing about vigilantism in Sub Saharan Africa…

The Woes of Multiculturalism

My exploration of human rights has led me to the pressing issue of minority rights. From the Romanis in France to the Turks in Germany, I have witnessed a wave of anti-immigration sentiments sweeping across Europe, and I fear that…

Chinese Protectionism: Overrated

It has become very common in America to discuss Chinese protectionism, but in many important ways this misunderstands the Chinese government’s position. They don’t care about business, as one blog puts it “the Chinese government cares almost exclusively about the…

At an Impasse

In a recent article on the Israel/Palestine conflict, Michael Hudson commented: “the Soviet empire collapsed, democracy advanced around the globe, Asia began to rise and the West began to decline. It is all quite disorienting. But one thing remains constant:…

Two weeks ago experts and security officials in Syria called for “ever increasing international pressure” on the Assad regime, rather than any military intervention in Syria [1]. It seems this is exactly what has been happening the past week: the…

Eco-Imperialism

Eco-Imperialism is a term coined by author Paul Driessen in his book Eco-Imperialism: Green Power, Black Death. This refers to the Western environmentalism that is forced upon developing countries that allows the dominating force to maintain an edge over the…

Inequality at the Core

            The political unrest that has unfolded in Sudan over the course of decades is a prime example of the catastrophic results inequality can bring to a region. It is important to look back and identify the reasons why such…

Truth and Reconciliation

The economy, politics, education and racism in Zimbabwe- I’ve discussed all of these topics in my previous blogs and I’ve made it obvious that these things are evidence of an unstable and seemingly hopeless situation in the country. I’ve made…

Corruption and Democratic Stability

In 1985 when José Sarney assumed the presidency, Brazil transferred from a military regime to a democracy. With the transition to democracy, civilians expected that corruption would subside and that corrupt officials would be held accountable for their scandals.  Democracy…

Jordan River Compromise

Last week I wrote about an alternative method of negotiation and compromise for Israelis and Palestinians by way of Israel relinquishing health care power to Palestine. This week I found an article in which the author asserts his belief that…

Is oil a blessing or a curse?

The prospects of great wealth from the oil industry are very promising for Argentina. The value of the recent discoveries of shale oil in various regions of the country has remained questionable over the past several months. Now, researchers, scientists,…

What’s Next?

In my first blog post of the term, I commented that Sub Saharan Africa was probably “the topic I am most oblivious on”. I can fortunately say that is no longer the case. This project of blogging on issues in…

Brazil’s inflation solution

Last time, I was talking about how one of Brazil’s biggest obstacle to economic growth was its increasing inflation rate.  It is the job of Brazil’s central bank to control the inflation rate to promote growth. However, one of the…

Britain: A Haven for Radical Islam?

Experts say that Britain’s generous asylum and immigration laws, traditions of free speech, and “watchful tolerance” of troublemakers, has caused the nation to become a headquarters for extremist Muslim clerics and a fertile recruitment ground for new followers over the…

Norway & xenophobia

I have been thinking a lot about multiculturalism this semester, trying to look at “Western” countries that have size-able non-Western immigrant populations. As we have read in class, there are very few countries in the modern, globalized world that are…